Home Blog Page 3

Armenian Women Candidates Win in Michigan and Maryland

0
Armenian Women Candidates Win in Michigan and Maryland

Mari Manoogian, who received the endorsement of the Armenian National Committee of America (ANCA), is now the State Representative for Michigan’s 40th district. Manoogian defeated her opponent, former Michigan GOP vice chair David Wolkinson 57 percent to 43 percent in the midterm elections.

The ANC of Michigan has been an ardent supporter of Manoogian since she announced her candidacy last year. “We are so incredibly excited to have Mari in office because we know that she will work to create real change in our district, representing the view of Armenian-Americans and others in the 40th district,” said Lara Nercessian, ANC of Michigan Chairwoman.

Manoogian, who was born and raised in Birmingham, Michigan, has been an active member of her community for years. After high school she attended George Washington University where she earned her degree from the Elliott School of International Affairs. She spent years working in Washington – on the Hill, at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations and finally, in the U.S. Department of State – while completing a graduate degree in Global Communication at GW and returning to Michigan to begin her campaign.

Manoogian, a great-grandchild of survivors of the Armenian Genocide, is an active resident of the Metro Detroit area where she attended the Armenian Relief Society (ARS) Zavarian Armenian language school in Troy for 10 years, participated in the St. Nersess Armenian Seminary summer conferences and was active in the Armenian Youth Federation (AYF) and Armenian Church Youth Organization of America (ACYOA). As an active member of the AGBU Young Professionals in Detroit, she has worked at AYF Camp Haiastan in Massachusetts and Hye Camp in Illinois.

I am grateful for the support of the ANCA, and the Armenian-American community throughout my campaign,” said Manoogian. “I look forward to representing the people of the 40th District and our community in the Michigan state legislature.”

Manoogian, who received an array of endorsements from federal, state and local leaders including President Barack Obama, Senator Gary Peters and Governor-Elect Gretchen Whitmer, also received multiple endorsements from local media, union and civic organizations.

Meantime, Lorig Charkoudian is now the first Armenian-American in recent memory, and perhaps ever, to serve in the Maryland state legislature. The Democratic candidate for Maryland’s House of Delegates was elected to serve as one of the three delegates for District 20.

“We are so excited to have Lorig in a leadership position in Maryland’s House of Delegates and celebrate her win as she works to advance issues and voice concerns that matter to the residents in her district including Armenian Americans,” said ANCA Eastern Region Board Chairman Steve Mesrobian.

Charkoudian, originally from Newton, Massachusetts, has been in public service for more than two decades and hails from a politically active family. As the Executive Director of Community Mediation Maryland and the impetus behind the growth of the Crossroads Farmer’s Market and the Takoma Park Silver Spring Commercial Kitchen, Charkoudian has worked tirelessly for the residents of District 20.

Charkoudian’s grandparents were survivors of the Armenian Genocide, and her family has had strong ties to the Armenian American communities in both Maryland and Massachusetts for decades. Charkoudian’s father Levon Charkoudian was Commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Community Affairs and served under Governor Francis Sargent. Her mother Bethel Bilezikian Charkoudian was active in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and serves on the Newton Parks and Recreation Commission.

Lorig earned a doctorate in economics from Johns Hopkins University and is the mother of Aline and Raffi who were instrumental in the success of her campaign. “We ran a grassroots campaign motivated by a commitment to building a more just and inclusive Maryland. I am excited to take this energy to Annapolis and begin turning this vision into legislation,” said Charkoudian.

Author information

avatar

ANCA

The Armenian National Committee of America (ANCA) is the largest and most influential Armenian-American grassroots organization. Working in coordination with a network of offices, chapters and supporters throughout the United States and affiliated organizations around the world, the ANCA actively advances the concerns of the Armenian American community on a broad range of issues. To learn more, visit www.anca.org.

The post Armenian Women Candidates Win in Michigan and Maryland appeared first on The Armenian Weekly.

Narrating Racism

0
Narrating Racism

In the 1956 movie The Searchers, two white girls are abducted from their family homestead during a raid by Comanche Native Americans. With their parents murdered and one sister raped and left for dead, the youngest girl remains with the Comanche for over five years. Throughout this time, her uncle, played by John Wayne, has been searching for her. Finding his niece now living as a Comanche and wife to the leader of the tribe, he attempts to kill her rather than leave her. In the end, she is “rescued” and returned to her family.

The film, a cinematic adaptation of a book written two years earlier by an American author of Western classics, Alan Le May, is well-known for its depiction of white racism toward Native Americans, and was used as a proxy during the civil rights movement (Native Americans as proxy for blacks), as well as its treatment of miscegenation. Yet despite its hateful narrative, The Searchers is widely cited as one of the best movies of all time.

Four years later, another book by Le May was dramatized in the movie The Unforgiven. The Unforgiven, though not held in nearly as high regard as The Searchers, delves even further into these problematic themes surrounding race, goodness, and family identity.

The Zachary family consists of mother, three sons and an adopted white daughter, Rachel, presumed rescued from a Kiowa raid on a settler wagon train. As the plot progresses, we learn that Rachel is, in fact, a Kiowa who was abducted during a raid on her village by the patriarch of the Zachary family. Rachel was brought back by the patriarch as a means of consoling his wife after the death of their own newborn daughter.

As they say, history is written by the victors. And in the United States, for the greater part of the twentieth century, the entertainment industry has touted narratives that vindicate, as opposed to liberate, those whose land has been stolen and people, massacred.

Again, the racism of the Zachary’s friends and neighbors toward Native Americans is depicted explicitly. Even Rachel, who was raised as part of this white settler family, is subject to it. One of Rachel’s adopted brothers, played by World War II veteran Audie Murphy, cannot handle the thought of his sister being a “red-hide nigger.” Rachel herself struggles with the realization that she is Kiowa. And when the Kiowa tribe attempts to recover her, she not only actively takes part in defending the Zachary homestead, but in the process, kills her Kiowa brother, thus solidifying her loyalty to whiteness and the Zachary family, and denouncing her ancestry by birth.

As they say, history is written by the victors. And in the United States, for the greater part of the twentieth century, the entertainment industry has touted narratives that vindicate, as opposed to liberate, those whose land has been stolen and people, massacred. Across our popular culture, they have been portrayed as vicious, bad, and somehow deserving of their tragic fate.

This is a common thread in the history of those who perpetrate genocide, in which victims continue to suffer the psychological trauma of the genocide. The continued depiction of the dishonest, disloyal, treacherous Armenians, for example, within the Turkish educational system perpetuates the stereotypes against them that have endured since the Ottoman Empire. To this day, being Armenian is a dirty word to many in Turkey and used as a weapon against political adversaries.

Like many of the Armenians in Turkey, native communities in America live in poverty, without rights, and without recognition; their realities invisible to the average citizen, yet their image continues to be appropriated again and again without their permission—distilled, as it were, and injected into the margins of American life. They are reduced either to performing as the ‘bad guy’ in a cult classic Western film or as a trivialized accessory to beloved American holidays.

Over the decades, Thanksgiving, it must be said, has taken on a life of its own, independent of the horrors committed against Native peoples. All the commercialization aside, it has essentially become a federally-mandated vacation, in which you are expected to get together with family and friends you love, and eat and be merry. To be honest, we need more of that. It’s just unfortunate that the cultural narrative upon which we engage in this merrymaking requires belittling the struggles of native peoples.

Regardless, we at the Armenian Weekly hope all our readers enjoy happy days this week with good friends and good food, and to, yes, be thankful for what we have; and thankful that Native communities continue to persist and fight for visibility in spite of it all. We hope that one day soon, they will be recognized as the authors of their own pasts, as well as their futures.

Author information

avatar

Weekly Editorial Board

The post Narrating Racism appeared first on The Armenian Weekly.

Suburban America Through the Recipe Cabinet of My Immigrant Mother

0
Suburban America Through the Recipe Cabinet of My Immigrant Mother

For years, I’ve eyed my mother’s recipe cabinet longingly. Brimming with books slung together in no particular rhyme or reason, it occupies two giant floor cupboards in my parents’ kitchen. I have hoped to one day muster up the patience to give it a thorough cleaning. Last September, I was in between jobs. I had some down time.

Having come to the United States as a refugee from Soviet Armenia in the seventies, my mother’s journey of assimilation into American culture has required a great deal of trial and error. As I peeked inside her cupboards stacked with messy piles of books and gadgets, I came to realize how much of that could be understood through the paradigm of food.

It’s no surprise that Armenian cookbooks are disproportionately represented in our recipe cabinet, which is home to legendary texts such as Rose Baboian’s Armenian-American Cookbook (1964), which made Western Armenian recipes, once learned by rote or passed down in a mother’s scrawl, accessible to an English-speaking generation; Alice Bezjian’s The Complete Armenian Cookbook (1995), so complete it isn’t even limited to Armenian food and includes Moroccan, Mexican, and even Japanese recipes; Linda Chirinian’s Secrets of Cooking: Armenian/Lebanese/Persian (1987); and even the surprising Armenian Vegan (2013) by Dikranouhi Kirazian. My mother had her own Armenian recipes, of course, and even kept tucked away a small notebook full of them, handwritten in her mother’s Armenian script. But these were familiar. Armenian recipes were useful for reference, but didn’t quite offer a new vocabulary to my mother’s culinary lexicon.

Easy Entertaining’s menu for Memorial Day Weekend, for example, suggests a hot artichoke dip, grilled chicken breasts, beer and soda, and instructions to stop by the local veterans’ hospital to thank them for their service or “inquire about volunteer opportunities.”

We lived in an affluent suburb of Washington, D.C., yet while Northern Virginia is a progressive area where diversity is welcomed, at least in my adolescent experience, assimilation was basically self-preservation. My mom cooked Armenian dishes like dolma, sarma, boregs, and traditional stews for us kids, but by our teens, my sister and I wanted to eat whatever Becca, Lauren, and Chrissy’s moms were serving, not the concoctions Araxie was cooking up that my classmates couldn’t pronounce. It didn’t help matters that we were children of the nineties to whom synthetic foods and flavors were shamelessly advertised. My mother yielded often to the will of corporate America as it expressed itself through her half-Armenian children’s food preferences. For better or worse, lunchables, Kool-Aid, and Fruit Roll-Ups were well-represented in my school lunches.

My sister and I took for granted our mother’s native fare, but our neighbors didn’t. In our cozy, suburban community, dinner party after dinner party established her as a celebrity for her Armenian cooking. In fact, it’s immediately clear from her recipe cabinet that the books most useful to my mother as a suburban homemaker were not the Armenian, but American cookbooks, which instruct readers on how to create and curate a uniquely American dining environment, with which she could infuse her ethnic flair.

“Some people are put off by entertaining because they think they have to live in a large, beautiful house and have expensive china and sterling silver in order to ‘entertain,’” wrote one passage of Betty Crocker’s Easy Entertaining (1982), “Nothing could be farther from the truth!”

Books like Betty Crocker’s Cookbook—which single-handedly produced the entire menu for our Thanksgiving dinners—and the Joy of Cooking introduce one not simply to recipes, but to the art of entertaining, educating readers on the traditions associated with certain holidays, as well as customary menu items (or, at least, those its authors deem acceptable). Easy Entertaining’s menu for Memorial Day Weekend, for example, suggests a hot artichoke dip, grilled chicken breasts, beer and soda, and instructions to stop by the local veterans’ hospital to thank them for their service or “inquire about volunteer opportunities.” All the while, a motivational tone is present, offering frequent words of encouragement for fledgling hosts.

One stood out amongst the books in this genre. Elegant Entertaining: Menus and Recipes for Special Occasions was just 36 pages long, yet its binding was worn and stained. Authored by two women from Pennsylvania with no reference to a publishing year, this no-nonsense little pamphlet was devoid of cultural commentary, but my mother confirmed its calligraphed recipes made for outstanding, time-tested classics. She has since mastered many, like the Potato Rounds (pg. 20) and Salmon Filet (pg. 7).

“To entertain friends at home is the nicest way to say they’re special,” goes the short, two-sentence preface to the book. “These recipes and menu ideas will help you do so with ease… and a bit of elegance.”

My mother’s search to understand the authentic American experience often brought us to where it all started—Colonial Williamsburg. During our family vacations to the area, she purchased several cookbooks. To be honest, she never uses them, but they add to the eclectic patchwork of culinary interests that is her recipe cabinet. Shepherd’s Pie, an old, Anglo-saxon staple, was always a beloved family favorite in our home, and Betty Crocker‘s recipe served us just fine.

But it wasn’t the colonial influence that drew my mother and so many other immigrants to this country; it was the multiculturalism. Armenia had been a homogenous country, unwelcoming to outsiders, which she and her family were. Though they were Armenian, they had only come from Romania to the Soviet Union in the forties. They were part of an entire demographic of citizens who were discriminated against from the outset, and referred to by the slang word, aghpar. My mother, traumatized by that experience, has spent a lifetime celebrating the openness this country represents, introducing the culinary contributions of countless other immigrant communities to our dinner table. German Schnitzel, Polish Perogies, and Irish corned beef were all dishes we ate regularly.

Quick, easy, and straightforward meals, like pizza, spaghetti, and burgers (though her patties always had a kufte-like taste to them), were also staples in our family. Like many suburban households, we were always on the go—hopping from piano lessons, to basketball and then soccer practice. There were even times when our fast-paced lifestyle left my mother, who worked full-time at the State Department, no time for cooking at all.

After an hour of sorting, I looked at the pile of discards, which contained: the droves and droves of celebrity and fad diet books—it wouldn’t be a suburban household without them, though they never yielded anything tasty—as well as the countless manuals to now-long-gone gadgets that at one point promised to make food-preparation faster or easier or healthier—bread-baking machines, smoothie and yogurt-makers, grinders, blenders—but had all either lost their fashionable appeal or ability to work.

My mother flurried about in the kitchen, amused, as I messily stacked books in piles according to relevance and genre. Occasionally, she’d comment on certain ones and particularly successful recipes they contained. She beamed at the suggestion that I take some with me to my new apartment, and I excitedly set about earmarking recipes I intended to try on my own. “It’s too much work to make it yourself,” she casually remarked when I asked for advice on preparing a Thanksgiving menu one day in the future, “It’s easier to just buy the stuff ready-made.”

It’s odd to consider that as hard as my mother worked on the meals of my childhood, I was rarely, if ever, invited to assist in preparing them. She preferred I spend that time practicing piano, playing sports, doing homework, or out with friends; fitting into this American life, as it were, on her behalf.

 

Author information

Karine Vann

Karine Vann

Editor

Karine Vann is the editor of the Armenian Weekly. She is a musician who transitioned into journalism while living in the Caucasus for several years. Her work has appeared in Smithsonian.com, The New Food Economy, and a number of other publications. Her critical writings focus primarily on the politics of culture, media analyses, and the environment. She spends her spare time in front of a keyboard, at a farm, or making a fuss about zero waste. If you have comments, questions, pitches, or leads, she can be reached at karine@armenianweekly.com.

The post Suburban America Through the Recipe Cabinet of My Immigrant Mother appeared first on The Armenian Weekly.

New Political Parties and a Failed Electoral Code

0
New Political Parties and a Failed Electoral Code
A man casting his ballot in the 2012 Armenian Parliamentary elections (Photo: Photolure)

On December 9, Armenia will have new parliamentary elections, in a totally new Armenia where it seems likely the corruption and election violations that scandalized former elections are now things of the past. Yet in spite of the positive developments, democracy in Armenia remains plagued by a dark cloud: a flawed electoral code left behind from ousted Prime Minister Serge Sarkisian.

On October 29th, legislation put forward by Pashinyan’s government to amend the electoral code failed to pass for a second time; this time with only one vote missing. Some days later, Armenia’s National Assembly failed to vote in a new Prime Minister for a second time, subsequently dissolving itself and forcing the country to have new elections. In one week, the Velvet Revolution was only able to meet one of its two promises/demands.

Most political parties agree the code needs significant amending, especially the controversial territorial rating system on closed party lists that political actors deem to be unfair. According to many critics, the ‘rating’ system allows a path for oligarchs to secure seats in Parliament.

Other components of the reform were to increase the quota for women, lower the minimum threshold for parties and alliances and amend the quota for ethnic minorities. Though work for reform has been done all summer and fall between the Parliamentary Working Group and Prime Minister’s Special Commission on Electoral Reform, it seems the issue came too early for Parliament to come to a consensus, alongside a bit of Republican Party-led sabotage.

Due to this missed opportunity or unfulfilled promise, Mikayel Nahapetyan, assistant to deputy-PM Tigran Avinyan, resigned from his position. His resignation indirectly put blame on the ruling government for not trying hard enough to push for such a key policy promise. While the government would like to blame the other parties in the National Assembly for the failure, they ultimately will not feel its hurt in the upcoming elections where they are expecting to get a majority of the votes.

Nahapetyan is also one of founders of the new Kaghaktsu Voroshum “Citizen’s Decision” Social-Democratic Party, which goes by the acronym SDPCD, which announced its official foundation on November 3 in Yerevan. The new party, driven by Social-Democratic norms, is pushing many different policy issues with social justice as a guiding pillar. Their founding membership at this point seems to comprise of Yerevan-based activists who never felt compelled to join any political party before the April Revolution, yet now feel compelled to take a proactive approach to the current political reality by filling in the ideological voids in Armenia’s political culture.

The SDPCD are especially pushing for social welfare policies directed toward improving the quality and access to education and health care, considering them basic needs that need to be met by the state. Transparency or direct democracy is an issue that they claim differentiates them from all other parties; for example, all party meetings will be open and recorded for members and non-members.

In terms of post-revolution transitional justice, they mainly emphasize a clean-up of the judicial system that aided the former government’s corrupt endeavors, but have a tolerant approach to all others who engaged in some form of illegal behavior under the auspices of the former ruling-Republican party. They emphasize the return of stolen capital back into the state budget, amnesty for those involved and eliminating businessmen from government structures.

Reform for the electoral code and the law on political parties are also policy issues that they emphasize, claiming that democratic processes cannot begin or be fair without them. Other political analysts and parties have also stressed the need for reform of the latter legislations. The Pashinyan-led revolutionary government has and currently vocalizes these policy points and attempts to enact them to varying degrees.

The SDPCD have not yet decided if they will participate in the upcoming elections due to certain legal procedures requiring approval by certain government bodies. However, they have two paths: either to strengthen and continue institutionalizing their new party, or attempt to enter parliament and continue the processes in parallel. Criticisms as to the redundancy of another Armenian party driven by social democracy were also immediately raised by journalists, with parallels drawn to existing parties, like the Social-Democratic Hnchakian Party and the statedly socialist Armenian Revolutionary Federation.

The young party, along with many others will face challenges entering the new Armenia’s National Assembly without the benefit of electoral code reforms. There are concerns that unwanted oligarchs will probably enter the Republican and/or Prosperous Armenia Party’s factions via the territorial rating system that currently exists.

The territorial ‘rating’ system is a separate localized component to a party national list where citizens can vote for local candidates. Firstly, the problems arise with the fact that each vote for a local candidate is also counted for their party’s national list. Second, up to six candidates are encouraged to compete throughout the 13 electoral districts. What has often happened is that the Republican Party has put forward multiple candidates in the same districts to compete against each other and as a result were able to garner significant amounts of votes for their party. In previous codes only one local candidate was able to be put forward in 41 electoral districts. It is not only essentially unfair but was specifically designed for the former ruling party to stay in perpetual power.

Considering that the new ideologically-driven parties like SDPCD and Sasna Tsrer, along with others, do not have enough time to strengthen their bases until next month’s election, they may not be able to pass the 5% threshold currently needed to enter Parliament. The other option is to enter a faction with a second or third party, raising the threshold to 7%.

The point was to do things the right way and fulfill the promises of the revolution. Those who pushed the revolution wanted a Parliamentary body that cultivated a healthy, ideologically diverse body politic to work and solve the country’s issues, void of corrupt feudal lords and oligarchs. Only time will tell if they get one.

 

For additional reading on the ins and outs of the current electoral code and its issues, please read Hamazasp Danielyan and Harout Manoogian‘s articles.

 

Author information

avatar

Manuk Avedikyan

Manuk Avedikyan lives in Los Angeles, Calif. He has obtained a Masters degree in Political Science and International Affairs from American University of Armenia (AUA) and has Bachelors in History from California State University of Northridge (CSUN). He enjoys folk music, sports, and natural beauty.

The post New Political Parties and a Failed Electoral Code appeared first on The Armenian Weekly.

Concert: A Capella Christmas Concert by Boston Jazz Voices

0
Concert: A Capella Christmas Concert by Boston Jazz Voices

BOSTON, Mass.—The holidays are approaching and your friends at Armenia Tree Project want to help you and your family get into the Christmas spirit! Join us for an afternoon of Christmas cheer on Sunday, December 2, to sing holiday songs with the amazing a cappella group Boston Jazz Voices (www.BostonJazzVoices.org).

Fans of WGBH’s “Sing that Thing” competition may recognize them as last season’s finalists. Their stunning arrangements create a rich and unique sound.

Tickets are $30 each; a family four-pack of tickets is available for $100. There will be refreshments, a raffle, a silent auction and plenty of free parking at the Jenks Center, conveniently located in downtown Winchester.

We look forward to celebrating with you! For more details, contact us at info@armeniatree.org.

 

If you belong to a community organization and have an upcoming event you would like to submit for consideration in the Armenian Weekly, you can do so by following this link. Publication is not guaranteed.

Author information

Guest Contributor

Guest Contributor

Guest contributions to the Armenian Weekly are informative articles written and submitted by members of the community, which make up our community bulletin board.

The post Concert: A Capella Christmas Concert by Boston Jazz Voices appeared first on The Armenian Weekly.

Event: ARS Cambridge Chapter to Host Paint Night

0
Event: ARS Cambridge Chapter to Host Paint Night

ARS Cambridge Shushi Chapter is hosting a Paint Night benefiting St. Stephen’s Armenian Elementary School. Instruction by artist Katerina Delegas. $45 a person. $35 for guests under 21. Includes wine and refreshments, canvas, paint, and use of all art supplies. Sunday, December 2, 2018. 5-8 p.m. Papken Suni Agoump, 76 Bigelow Avenue Watertown, MA 02472. For tickets email ARSshushi@gmail.com or call Ani Zargarian at (617) 970-5638.

 

If you belong to a community organization and have an upcoming event you would like to submit for consideration in the Armenian Weekly, you can do so by following this link. Publication is not guaranteed.

Author information

Guest Contributor

Guest Contributor

Guest contributions to the Armenian Weekly are informative articles written and submitted by members of the community, which make up our community bulletin board.

The post Event: ARS Cambridge Chapter to Host Paint Night appeared first on The Armenian Weekly.

Talk: Dr. Susan Pattie to Discuss the Armenian Legionnaires in Watertown and Worcester

0
Talk: Dr. Susan Pattie to Discuss the Armenian Legionnaires in Watertown and Worcester

Dr. Susan Pattie will present her newly published book, The Armenian Legionnaires: Sacrifice and Betrayal in World War I, in two separate upcoming lectures.

The first will take place at the AGBU New England Center, 247 Mt. Auburn St. in Watertown, Mass., on Thursday, November 29, 2018, at 7:30 p.m. The event is sponsored by the National Association for Armenian Studies and Research (NAASR). Dr. Pattie will be joined for this lecture by Varak Ketsemanian (PhD student, Department of Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University), author of chapter 2 in The Armenian Legionnaires. This event is free and open to the public. A reception and refreshments will take place before and after the program. For more information about this program, contact NAASR at 617-489-1610 or hq@naasr.org.

The second event will take place Sunday, December 2, 2018, at Noon Holy Trinity Armenian Apostolic Church 635 Grove Street, Worcester, Mass. Admission is free. Copies of the book will be available for purchase. Contact George Aghjayan at 774-364-0123 or sakratpalu@gmail.com for more information.

About the topic: 

Following the devastation resulting from the Armenian Genocide in 1915, survivors of the massacres were dispersed across the Middle East, North and South America and Europe. Not content with watching World War I silently from the sidelines, a large number of Armenian volunteers joined the specially formed Légion d’Orient. Trained in Cyprus, the Legion fought courageously in Palestine alongside General Allenby, playing a crucial role in defeating the German and Ottoman forces in Palestine at the Battle of Arara in September 1918.

The Armenian legionnaires signed up on the understanding that they would be fighting in Syria and Turkey and, should the Allies be successful, would be part of an occupying army in their old homelands, laying the foundation for a self-governing Armenian state.

Susan Pattie describes the motivations and dreams of the Armenian Legionnaires and their ultimate betrayal as the French and the British shifted their priorities, leaving the Armenian homelands to the emerging Republic of Turkey. Complete with eyewitness accounts, letters and photographs, The Armenian Legionnaires book provides an insight into relations between the Great Powers through the lens of a small, powerless people caught in a war that was not their own, but which had already destroyed their known world.

Susan Pattie is an Honorary Senior Research Associate at University College London and former Director of the Armenian Institute in London. She holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Michigan and is also the author of Faith In History: Armenians Rebuilding Community.

 

This article is an announcement submitted to the Armenian Weekly and has been published as a courtesy. If your organization has an event you would like to submit for consideration, please email us at editor@armenianweekly.com. Publication is not guaranteed.

Author information

Guest Contributor

Guest Contributor

Guest contributions to the Armenian Weekly are informative articles written and submitted by members of the community, which make up our community bulletin board.

The post Talk: Dr. Susan Pattie to Discuss the Armenian Legionnaires in Watertown and Worcester appeared first on The Armenian Weekly.

Մակեդոնիան Հունգարիայից պահանջում է ապաստան չտրամադրել նախկին վարչապետին

0
Մակեդոնիան Հունգարիայից պահանջում է ապաստան չտրամադրել նախկին վարչապետին

Սկոպյեում Հունգարիայի դեսպանը հրավիրվել է Մակեդոնիայի արտգործնախարարություն:

«Բացառվում է, որ առանց մարդկանց համաձայնության հարկային բեռ ավելացվի». Արարատ Միրզոյան

0
«Բացառվում է, որ առանց մարդկանց համաձայնության հարկային բեռ ավելացվի». Արարատ Միրզոյան

«Քննարկվող գաղափարը հայտարարագրումն է, ոչ թե հարկումը», – վստահեցնում է առաջին փոխվարչապետը:

ԱԽ քարտուղարը մեկնում է Մոսկվա

0
ԱԽ քարտուղարը մեկնում է Մոսկվա

Հայաստանի անվտանգության խորհրդի քարտուղար Արմեն Գրիգորյանի գլխավորած պատվիրակությունն այսօր աշխատանքային այցով կմեկնի Մոսկվա` մասնակցելու ԱՊՀ ԱԽ 6-րդ համաժողովին։

Ըստ Հայաստանի անվտանգության խորհրդի ֆեյսբուքյան էջի, այցի ընթացքում կլինեն նաև երկկողմ հանդիպումներ։